Abnormal Uterine Bleeding | Treatment

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How is abnormal uterine bleeding treated?

There are several treatment options for abnormal bleeding, depending on the cause of your bleeding, your age and whether you want to get pregnant in the future. Your doctor will help you decide which treatment is right for you. Or, if your doctor decides that a hormone imbalance is causing your abnormal bleeding, you and your doctor may decide to wait and see if the bleeding improves on its own. Some treatment options include the following:

Birth control pills. Birth control pills contain hormones that can stop the lining of your uterus from getting too thick. They can also help keep your menstrual cycle regular and reduce cramping. Some types of birth control pills, especially the progestin-only pill (also called the “mini-pill”) can actually cause abnormal bleeding for some women. Let your doctor know if the pill you’re taking doesn’t control your abnormal bleeding.

Intrauterine device (IUD). If birth control pills don’t control your bleeding, your doctor may suggest an IUD. An IUD is a small, plastic device that your doctor inserts into your uterus through your vagina to prevent pregnancy. One type of IUD releases hormones, and this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell your doctor if this happens to you.

A D&C, or dilatation and curettage, is a procedure in which the opening of your cervix is stretched just enough so a surgical tool can be put into your uterus. The tool is used to scrape away the lining of your uterus. The removed lining is checked in a lab for abnormal tissue. A D&C is done under general anesthesia (while you're in a sleep-like state).

If you're having heavy bleeding, a D&C may be done both to find out the problem and to treat the bleeding. The D&C itself often makes heavy bleeding stop. Your doctor will decide if this procedure is necessary.

Hysterectomy. This type of surgery removes the uterus. If you have a hysterectomy, you won’t have any more periods and you won’t be able to get pregnant. Hysterectomy is major surgery that requires general anesthesia and a hospital stay. It may require a long recovery period. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of hysterectomy.

Endometrial ablation is a surgical procedure that destroys the lining of the uterus. Unlike a hysterectomy, it does not remove the uterus. Endometrial ablation may stop all menstrual bleeding in some women. However, some women still have light menstrual bleeding or spotting after endometrial ablation. A few women have regular menstrual periods after the procedure. Women who have endometrial ablation still need to use some form of birth control even though, in most cases, pregnancy is not likely after the procedure.

Your doctor can do endometrial ablation in several different ways. Newer endometrial ablation techniques do not require general anesthesia or a hospital stay. The recovery time after this procedure is shorter than recovery time after a hysterectomy.

Source

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding by KA Oriel, MD, and S Schrager, MD (American Family Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/991001ap/1371.html)

Written by familydoctor.org editorial staff

Reviewed/Updated: 02/14
Created: 09/00

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