Prostatitis | Treatment

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How is prostatitis treated?

The treatment is based on the cause. Antibiotics are used to treat prostatitis that is caused by an infection. You might have to take antibiotics for several weeks or a few months. If prostatitis is severe, you might have to go to a hospital for treatment with fluids and antibiotics.

What if my prostatitis is not caused by infection?

Because doctors do not yet understand what causes prostatitis without infection, it can be hard to treat. Your doctor might try an antibiotic to treat a hidden infection. Other treatments are aimed at making you feel better.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen (two brand names: Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (one brand name: Aleve), and hot soaking baths may help you feel better. Some men get better by taking medicines that help the way the bladder or prostate gland work.

Can prostatitis come back?

Men who have had prostatitis once are more likely to get it again. Antibiotics may not get into the prostate gland well. Small amounts of bacteria might "hide" in the prostate and not be killed by antibiotics. Once you stop taking the antibiotic, the infection can get bad again. If this happens, you might have to take antibiotics for a longer period of time to prevent another infection. Prostatitis that is not caused by infection is often chronic. If you have this kind of prostatitis, you might have to take medicine for a long time.

Should I have my prostate gland taken out if I have prostatitis?

Prostatitis can usually be treated with medicine. Most of the time, surgery is not needed.

Source

Treatment of Prostatitis by JJ Stevermer, M.D., M.S.P.H. and SK Easley, M.D. (American Family Physician May 15, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000515/3015.html)

Written by familydoctor.org editorial staff

Reviewed/Updated: 04/14
Created: 09/00

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